Free Shipping on all orders over $99*

Why Kids Need The Arts

August 06, 2018

Why Kids Need The Arts

As you know, here at Roasted Fox, we are great believes in the great outdoors and the many, many benefits it brings to children and families.

But this is not to say we don't love the indoors as well. We love reading, we love music, we love crafts and we love board games. 

I recently saw an article on Facebook shared by a family member who also happens to be a school principal and it rang absolutely true in this regard in that it perfectly illustrated what happens if we deprive our children of any part of the full human experience.

I hope you enjoy it. 

 

by Phillip Pullman.

Children need art and stories and poems and music as much as they need love and food and fresh air and play.

If you don’t give a child food, the damage quickly becomes visible. If you don’t let a child have fresh air and play, the damage is also visible, but not so quickly. If you don’t give a child love, the damage might not be seen for some years, but it’s permanent.

But if you don’t give a child art and stories and poems and music, the damage is not so easy to see. It’s there, though. Their bodies are healthy enough; they can run and jump and swim and eat hungrily and make lots of noise, as children have always done, but something is missing.

It’s true that some people grow up never encountering art of any kind, and are perfectly happy and live good and valuable lives, and in whose homes there are no books, and they don’t care much for pictures, and they can’t see the point of music. Well, that’s fine. I know people like that. They are good neighbours and useful citizens.

But other people, at some stage in their childhood or their youth, or maybe even their old age, come across something of a kind they’ve never dreamed of before. It is as alien to them as the dark side of the moon. But one day they hear a voice on the radio reading a poem, or they pass by a house with an open window where someone is playing the piano, or they see a poster of a particular painting on someone’s wall, and it strikes them a blow so hard and yet so gentle that they feel dizzy. Nothing prepared them for this. They suddenly realise that they’re filled with a hunger, though they had no idea of that just a minute ago; a hunger for something so sweet and so delicious that it almost breaks their heart. They almost cry, they feel sad and happy and alone and welcomed by this utterly new and strange experience, and they’re desperate to listen closer to the radio, they linger outside the window, they can’t take their eyes off the poster. They wanted this, they needed this as a starving person needs food, and they never knew. They had no idea.

That is what it’s like for a child who does need music or pictures or poetry to come across it by chance. If it weren’t for that chance, they might never have met it, and might have passed their whole lives in a state of cultural starvation without knowing it.

The effects of cultural starvation are not dramatic and swift. They’re not so easily visible.

And, as I say, some people, good people, kind friends and helpful citizens, just never experience it; they’re perfectly fulfilled without it. If all the books and all the music and all the paintings in the world were to disappear overnight, they wouldn’t feel any the worse; they wouldn’t even notice.

But that hunger exists in many children, and often it is never satisfied because it has never been awakened. Many children in every part of the world are starved for something that feeds and nourishes their soul in a way that nothing else ever could or ever would.

We say, correctly, that every child has a right to food and shelter, to education, to medical treatment, and so on. We must understand that every child has a right to the experience of culture. We must fully understand that without stories and poems and pictures and music, children will starve.

 

Written by Philip Pullman for the tenth anniversary of the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award in 2012.

You can read the original article here or read more from Philip Pullman here.





Size Guide & Guarantee

 

Based on averages, we believe that a "Size 2" should actually fit your child from when they are two to when they are three.  However, we do appreciate that not all children are built the same and so in the spirit of helping you make an informed choice, have included our manufacturing size guide below.

Having said that, we also appreciate that buying clothes online can be difficult and even if you measure your kids according to the chart, sometimes things just don't fit right.

 

Therefore, we offer all our customers, the right to return items from their first order in order to exchange them for different sizes at no charge. Simply contact us and we will be more than happy to help you out. 

 

 

Clothing Size Guide:

(in cms)

6m

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Chest

48

50

52

54

56

58

60

63

66

69

71

Waist

50

51

52

53

54

55

56

58

60

62

64

Hip

54

56

58

60

62

64

66

69

72

75

78

Height

76

80

89

98

107

114

120

126

132

138

144

Leg

35

38

44

50

57

62

66

70

74

78

82

 

Plae Shoes Size Guide:

All sizes published on our website are US sizes. Make sure to refer to the below shoe size conversion chart if you have any questions about your child’s foot length and the corresponding size in AU, European, or UK sizing.

We know how challenging it is to get the right fit, that’s why we’ve designed a simple process you can use at home. Print out our PLAE FIT KIT and try it out. 

US Size EU Size UK Size AU Size Inches Cms
6 22 5 5.5 5.5 14
7 23 6 6 5.7 14.5
8 24 7 7 5.9 15
9 25 8 8 6.1 15.5
9.5 26 8.5 8.5 6.3 16
10 27 9 9 6.5 16.5
11 28 10 10 6.7 17
12 29 1 11 6.9 17.5
12.5 30 11.5 12 7.1 18
13 31 12 12.5 7.3 18.5
1 32 13 13 7.5 19
2 33 1 1 7.9 20
2.5  34 1.5 2 8.1 20.5
3.5 35 2.5 3 8.5 21.5
4 36 3.5 3.5 8.9 22.5

 

Wellies Size Guide:

In order to ensure correct size for your feet, we have measured the internal length of each insole of each Wellington boot as shown in the table below. Please measure one of your insoles that currently fit your foot length, and match it to our measurement, to find your correct size. We have found that this is the most efficient way, as shoe sizes and measurements vary between manufacturers.

AU Size EU Size Insole Measurement cm
1 19 12.5 cm
2 20 13.5 cm
3 21 14 cm
4 22 14.5 cm
5 23 15.5 cm
6 24 16 cm
7 25 16.5 cm
8 26 17 cm
9 27 17.5 cm
10 28 18.5 cm
11 29 19 cm
12 30 19.5 cm
13 31 20 cm
1 32 21 cm
2 33 22 cm
3 34 23 cm
4 35 23.5 cm

 

Please note: while all care is taken to ensure the accuracy of this information and the final result, the processes of manufacturing (marking, cutting, sewing and finishing) mean that some variances will occur.

 

If you have any questions regarding sizing, please feel free to contact us using the form below.